Difference between teaching piano and keyboard

by dottie
(Charlottetown PEI canada)

Do teachers teach keyboard & piano differently? Explain.

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Sep 20, 2009
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Piano vs Keyboard
by: Alfred

Dear Dottie: Wish I were a full-blown musician so as to make 100% comment. I play keyboards by ear, but I believe I'm right in saying that music is music whether you are taught by a piano teacher or by a keyboard teacher. Some basic differences probably are: "Weight" (touch) of piano keys vs "Touch Sensitivity" feature in a keyboard; Pedals in a piano vs those available for a keyboard. Where you have advantages in a keyboard are in the "Bells & Whistles" not available in a piano, but we stray from your question if we go down that path.

Nov 17, 2009
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One difference
by: Anonymous

Hi

I play piano when available and keyboard when I have to!!! The difference between the two that is a problem for me is to do with the pressure required to produce the sound from a note.

With the piano I have to put the key quite far down to create a sound - with the keyboard - unfortunately - I hardly have to touch it for it to sound. This usually occurs when I am moving my hand from one chord or note to another and ISN'T what I want at all. Assorted squeaks and tones that aren't meant to be there are embarrassing and I'm still trying to avoid this happening.

Hope that this helps.

Ann

Nov 17, 2009
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Piano vs Keyboard
by: Alfred

Dear Ann: I read your comment with much interest. I believe the "feather" touch you experience with some keyboards is that they are TOUCH SENSITIVE models. Since my original post, I now realize that Yamaha also offers some keyboards with WEIGHTED KEYS, and the difference in these keyboard types could be the reason for the "pressure" applied as you state. Keep well.

Nov 17, 2009
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touch sensitive
by: Anonymous

Hi Alfred

Yes - mine is touch sensitive though I set the sensitivity to 2 rather than the maximum 5. Perhaps I should have bought a different keyboard? I do love the speed with which I can set this one up - or is that common to most of the newer models? (I used to need a list for my previous one - PSR220 if I am remembering correctly - and had to laboriously set each feature up separately.)

Good to hear from you.

Ann

Nov 17, 2009
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Touch Sensitive Keyboards
by: Alfred

Dear Ann: I'm not an expert, and therefor hesitant to be totally assertive. The PSR E403 I own is a Touch Sensitive model and it allows set-up very easily, and fast. From the little I know
about the "Weighted" models,they must work as Yamaha touts. Unless you are really dissatisfied with your present unit, I can see no reason to buy a "Weighted" one. I think you will get used to the one you have soon. Experiment, altering the sensitivity levels, you might find one which eliminates the unwanted and embarrassing squeaks and tones. Good luck.

Nov 18, 2009
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Piano/Keyboard Teachers
by: Patti

Some teachers teach piano and keyboard very differently. I would strongly reccomend any beginning student to start with lessons on a piano. "Keyboard" teachers are few and far between. Most are piano teachers that do not have a piano in their studio. If you are interested in learning keyboard operations, want to play in a band without formal piano training or are just playing for fun out of fake books than keyboard lessons will suit you fine. Be sure you have an actual keyboard teacher for this. I own a music school of over 200 piano students. Out of these 200 there are two that have their lessons on a keyboard. Neither of them want to learn the mechanics. They are really piano students that think keyboard is cooler and are not getting the full benefit of their lessons. Piano teachers are able to teach you more solid technique and playing skills that even a weighted keyboard will not compare to. To get the most for your money take piano lessons and switch to keyboard later. It is much tougher to switch from keyboard to piano than from piano to keyboard. The music reading is the same. The techniques and sounds you produce on a piano are uncomparable. Good Luck!

Jul 13, 2010
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Keyboard teacher
by: Anonymous

You can hardly find a good keyboard teacher.
The music schools in the city are purely commercial, the place is noisy with students sitting close to each other in a cramped place - I know it is difficult to get a place to run the music school, but it should not be located in a busy place or market place where the noise from the flowing traffic adds to the noise pollution. How can a student learn music in such a school.

Parents should find out if the environment is noiseless. Please avoid putting your child in a music school where the teacher simply tries to teach a group of students at the same hour or same time. His mind will always be in working out if the time has come to collect the monthly fees only. The best for learning an instrument is through a good teacher who can give individual attention. He should take keyboard classes only for one student at a time, it should not be class room teaching.

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